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Exclusive: 'Harry' Moving to 2 p.m. in Four Fox Markets

Updated: Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, 12:03 pm PT

The Fox Owned Television Stations are moving NBCUniversal’s new daytime strip, Harry, to 2 p.m. from 4 p.m. in four top markets — New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco — starting Monday.

According to sources, the move is intended to help Harry perform more strongly against its time-period competition, something that’s much harder to do at 4 p.m. when it’s facing the likes of Judge Judy and Dr. Phil. Fox ideally would like to improve the show’s performance across all of its 17 markets and renew it for a second season. 

Related: Syndication Ratings: 'Harry' Scores Best Talk Debut in Three Years

For example, on WNYW New York at 4 p.m. in October, Harry averaged a 0.7 in households, down 30% from what Warner Bros.’ TMZ Live was doing in time period one year ago. On KTTV Los Angeles, Harry averaged a 0.4 in households in October, down 63% from TMZ Live last year.

The decision to renew also will depend on whether NBCUniversal wants to continue to produce the New York City-based show, which is relatively expensive in light of its ratings.

In New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, TMZ Live will return to 4 p.m. In San Francisco, where the move doesn't take place until Monday, Dec. 5, local news will air at 4 p.m.

Harry — which stars Harry Connick Jr., and features his band — launched in September on the Fox owned stations in top markets. In the week ended Nov. 13, Harry averaged a 1.2 live plus same day household rating, according to Nielsen Media Research, steady with the prior week.

Contributing editor Paige Albiniak has been covering the business of television for nearly 25 years. She is a longtime contributor to Next TV, Broadcasting + Cable and Multichannel News. She concurrently serves as editorial director for entertainment marketing association Promax. She has written for such publications as TVNewsCheck, The New York Post, Variety, CBS Watch and more. Albiniak was B+C’s Los Angeles bureau chief from September 2002 to 2004, and an associate editor covering Congress and lobbying for the magazine in Washington, D.C., from January 1997-September 2002.