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Disney Plus Reveals Deets on Another 'Star Wars' Series in 'The Mandalorian' Season Finale

Disney
(Image credit: Disney)

In our humble opinion, the “spoiler alert” is a bane of a Western society that now has much more important things to worry about than the revealing of plot points and other information regrettably leaked to individuals before they can see the movie or TV show that contains them. 

But in this case, we get it. If you haven’t seen the season 2 finale of Disney Plus’ The Mandalorian, and you like this show, CLICK AWAY! 

Otherwise, here’s the news.

Disney Plus, which used its big corporate presentation last week to announce that no less than 10 new “Star Wars” series iterations will be added to the service over the next two years, leaked details on another one of those shows during a post-credits scene added to The Mandalorian season finale, which posted Friday.

The Book of Boba Fett

(Image credit: Disney Plus)

Boba Fett, the “Star Wars” series’ venerable “Beskar”-clad bounty hunter, is getting his own Disney Plus show, The Book of Boba Fett, which will debut in December 2021.

Also read: Disney Plus Emerges as Multibillion-dollar 'Star Wars' Franchise’s New Hope

In the post-credits scene, Boba Fett (actor Temuera Morrison) visits the palace of infamous, corpulent, slug-like crime boss Jabba the Hutt, now overseen by his greasy sidekick, Bib Fortuna. Boba shoots all the inhabitants, then assumes Jabba’s throne, with sidekick bounty hunter Fennec Shand (actor Ming-Na Wen) by his side. 

The character of Boba Fett dates all the way back to the original 1977 “Star Wars” film, Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope. Notably, the British actor who originally played Boba Fett, Jeremy Bulloch, died Thursday at the age of 75. (Favreau told Good Morning America that director Robert Rodriguez is joining the producing team for the new Boba Fett series.)

Last week at Disney’s investor day, Kareem Daniel, chairman of media and entertainment distribution, said there’d be “roughly” 10 new upcoming “Star Wars” series on Disney Plus, sating an appetite whetted—but certainly not sated—by two 8-episode hit seasons of The Mandalorian, with the third coming months down the line. 

Also included in that bounty will be a show built around Ahsoka Tano, a “Jedi Knight” character who originated in franchise creator George Lucas’ three “prequel” movies in the early aughts, and who was more fully developed in the long-running animated Star Wars: The Clone Wars series that was launched by Turner Networks all the way back in 2008, and just ended its truncated run on Disney Plus earlier this year. 

Actor Rosaria Dawson stars in Disney Plus’ live-action iteration of Ahsoka Tano, after taking on the role as the character re-emerged in The Mandalorian this past season.

Perhaps even more anticipated will be Obi Wan Kenobi, which will feature actor Ewan McGregor reprising his famous pre-Alec Guinness iteration of the eponymous Jedi Master. This series, which will also featuring Hayden Christensen reprising his role as Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader, will debut in 2022.

In July, with Disney Plus stuck in a 10-month chasm between seasons 1 and 2 of The Mandalorian, with little ability to ramp up production of other original shows due to the pandemic, Next TV pondered the potential of the “Star Wars” franchise on the streaming platform.

While they have been box office successes, to varying degrees, the three “Star Wars” theatrical “sequels” produced by J.J. Abrams following Disney’s $5 billion purchase of the "Star Wars" franchise from creator Lucas were, in our opinion (again, humble), narrative disasters. 

With The Mandalorian far more appealing to “Star Wars” purists under the orchestration of executive producer Jon Favreau, and the Clone Wars finally ending its jagged run on a high note under the direction of its EP, Dave Filoni, we wondered, might “Star Wars” and its legions of loyal fans around the world be better served by having Disney Plus atomize its stories into myriad series formats, and having Favreau and Filoni oversee them, instead of Abrams? 

We think this story today that ran in London’s The Telegraph supports our theory: What The Mandalorian gets right – and what Disney's Star Wars films got wrong