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Comcast Ads Spoof ‘80s Tunes to Mock Satellite TV

Comcast is taking another swing at its satellite TV competition with a fresh set of ads that mock its spaced-based rivals, including a few jabs directed squarely at DirecTV.

In an attempt to characterize satellite TV technology as antiquated and pushing the message, “Don’t fall for DirecTV,” Comcast’s new ads are kickin’ it old school and perhaps conjuring up images of spectacular mullets, glam bands, parachute pants and big sales at Chess King by applying some creative license to some catchy (kitschy?) hits from the ‘80s.

In addition to taking some playful jabs at its satellite TV competition, the ads, spotted this week by The Donohue Report, also play up some of the features and capabilities of X1, Comcast’s next-gen video platform, including its voice remote, large VOD library, as well as video downloading to mobile devices.

The timing of the ads are interesting in that AT&T is preparing to launch a set of  DirecTV-branded video services that are delivered over-the-top via broadband connections rather than through its satellite TV infrastructure. Dish Network, meanwhile, launched its OTT-TV service, Sling TV, last February.

The new ads are running in all Comcast divisions and were produced by Goodby Silverstein, according to Comcast.

And, now, the ads:

“We Built This Thingy…on Tech That’s Old” to Starship’s “We Built This City":

“Everybody is Bored Tonight” to Wang Chung’s “Everybody Have Fun Tonight”:

“You’re Not Gonna Watch It” to Twisted Sister’s “We’re Not Gonna Take It” (complete with a Dee Snider cameo):

Comcast’s new campaign follows a recent one from Charter Communications (starring Saturday Night Live alum Kevin Nealon as Captain Telstar) that also used playful anecdotes to characterize satellite TV as a platform that’s getting a bit long in the tooth.

DirecTV, meanwhile, has also been joining the advertising fun with a campaign that mocked the cable industry over its recent M&A activity with the troubled paring of two fictitious MSO giants -- Cable Corp. Inc. and CableWorld.