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TiVo Parent Xperi Saw 9% Pay TV Revenue Dip in Q2

TiVo Stream 4K
(Image credit: ZatzNotFunny)

TiVo parent company Xperi Holdings Inc. reported a 4.7% second-quarter revenue dip to $222.3 million, a shortfall driven, the company said, by expensive global pricing for silicon components and softness in one of its core TiVo businesses, supplying pay TV operators with video tech. 

Xperi's pay TV revenue declined 9% to $54 million in the second quarter, a period in which the company purchased IPTV tech vendor MobiTV at a bankruptcy auction for $18.5 million. 

Xperi CEO Jon Kirchner attributed the decline to he obvious: "Subscriber churn broadly consistent with industry trends," i.e. cord cutting. 

TiVo started pivoting toward direct-to-consumer streaming even before it announced its $3 billion deal to be acquired by Xperi two years ago. 

Without releasing any numerical details, Kirchner touted the expansion of footprint for the Android TV-powered TiVo Stream 4K platform, noting the addition of Target, Best Buy and QVC to a retail footprint that was previously limited to Walmart and Amazon. 

But no further light was shed on Xperi's earlier declared intentions to move Stream 4K platform away from Google's OS, and transition into the smart TV OEM business. 

More happily for Xperi, IP licensing revenue increased by 40% in the second quarter to $101.8 million, with TiVo renewing its patent deal with Google, among other constituents. 

This week, following last week's Xperi earnings report, the company announced yet another IP renewal, this one with Panasonic. 

Daniel Frankel

Daniel Frankel is the managing editor of Next TV, an internet publishing vertical focused on the business of video streaming. A Los Angeles-based writer and editor who has covered the media and technology industries for more than two decades, Daniel has worked on staff for publications including E! Online, Electronic Media, Mediaweek, Variety, paidContent and GigaOm. His reliable mid-range jump shot, deft ambidextrous post-up game and tough interior defense have been criminally overlooked.