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Survey: GOP Says Trump Fraud Claims Get Too Little Media Attention

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According to a new Pew survey, 58% of Republicans polled said the President's allegations of voter fraud, which he has been making at rallies, in tweets, TV interviews and press conferences, have gotten "too little attention" in post-election press coverage, while another 22% said that they have gotten about the right amount.

That is according to a just-released Pew Research Center American News Pathways Project survey of 12,648 U.S. adults conducted Nov. 18-29.

Also read: Survey Majority Sees Bias in News Outlet Election Coverage

And while 63% of Democrats said those allegations, which social media have generally been flagging as disputed or misleading, have gotten too much attention, more than a third said the level of attention has been about right, with 8% saying there has been too little attention.

Republicans who get their election news from Fox News and/or talk radio were more likely than Republicans with a wider news diet to say Trump's "post-election messaging" (i.e. the election was a fraud and he actually won) has been right and that such messaging deserves more media attention.

Also Read: Survey Majority Says Big Tech Censors Political Speech

Democrats were far more likely to say news outlets they "turn to most" did a good job of explaining the vote counting process compared to only 16% of Republicans who said that about the news sources they turned to.

When asked about all sources, the difference was even greater, with two thirds of Democrats (69%) saying the news media provided "largely accurate" coverage of the post-election landscape, while only 18% of Republicans said so.

As to the impact of social media coverage and moderation of election messages, 62% of Republicans said those decisions had "a major impact" on the election, while only 37% of Democrats said so.

As to whether that was a force for good or not, 78% of Republicans said they disapproved of the decisions by social media sites--Twitter and Facebook among them--to flag election news, while the same 78% of Democrats approved.

The margin of error for poll is plus/minus 1.5 percentage points.

Contributing editor John Eggerton has been an editor and/or writer on media regulation, legislation and policy for over four decades, including covering the FCC, FTC, Congress, the major media trade associations, and the federal courts. In addition to Multichannel News and Broadcasting + Cable, his work has appeared in Radio World, TV Technology, TV Fax, This Week in Consumer Electronics, Variety and the Encyclopedia Britannica.