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Comcast Expands ‘Unlimited’ Calling

Comcast said it has added five countries to Xfinity Voice Unlimited, the operator’s most popular home phone service plan: Mexico, India, China, Singapore, and South Korea.

Comcast is adding those contries to the plan today for customers in its Central Division, which includes Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, and Nashville. Next week, it will expand it to its Northeast Division (14 states from Maine to Virginia and Washington, D.C.), and will bring it to Comcast’s remaining phone subs by the end of August.

Comcast said nearly all of its 11 million-plus residential phone subs take the Xfinity Voice Unlimited plan, which also allows unlimited calling to Canada, Puerto Rico, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.

In addition to accessing service on traditional home phones, Comcast Xfinity Voice  also supports the Xfinity Connect app, which lets subs use up to four virtual phone numbers to make and receive calls and texts for no added cost via smartphone, tablets and other WiFi-connected devices. Subs can also use the app to check email, read or listen to home voicemail, and access contacts.

“Staying in touch with family and friends is important, regardless of geography. But sometimes even the shortest phone conversations can get expensive,” said Patti Loyack, Comcast Cable’s VP of communications, in a statement. “We hope the changes we’re making to Xfinity Voice Unlimited helps more people stay connected for less money.”

“We applaud Comcast’s decision to add India, China, Hong Kong, and Singapore to the Xfinity Voice Unlimited home phone plan. Although the Asian-American community is the fastest growing racial group in the United States, many of us still have family and friends in our countries of origin,” added Carl Hum, VP of policy and programs for Asian Americans Advancing Justice. “Comcast’s expanded plan will help our community keep in touch and connected without spending on calling cards or incurring wireless charges.”